Tag Archives: alcohol

Drinking Made Easy

28 Mar

Talk about an early adopter: last weekend in a Binny’s I saw two different beverage promoters, Absolut and St. Germaine toting their products to thirsty customers.  The schism between the two and their target audiences was night and day: Absolut had an easily recognizable brand with a young crowd whereas St. Germaine was forgettable with an older crowd.

Absolut clearly had a cohesive and branded message: two young, attractive women dressed alike in black Absolut threads with modern give-aways.  The freebies were suited to a young or at least a mobile audience.  The physical give-away was a cell phone screen cleaner in the shape of the new Absolut Wild Tea Vodka with an adhesive so it could stick to the back of your phone.

To further the experience, one of the ladies whipped out an iPad to show us their digital give-away; a free app called “Drinkspiration”.  Everybody loves free stuff.  It used to be that a free t-shirt was enough to ply one’s customer base but the app is the new reusable, mobile, multi-function freebie.

Beer School: The Brewing Process

20 Jul

Every brewer starts with 4 ingredients: water, hops, barley and yeast.  Yeast is weird, gross but also kind of magical — for some reason the image of the gross kid from middle school eating his scabs keeps popping up in my head … that’s what yeast is like in the trio of other noble ingredients.  But without that gross kid, middle school wouldn’t be the same and without yeast, beer could never exist.

But before yeast is added, the mash must happen.  Mashing is the part where you put your grains or extract in a large vessel and bring it to a boil for about an hour or sometimes longer.  Hops are added at different times during the boil to impart their particular characteristics in the bittering, flavoring and aroma aspects of the brew.

Next is the magic of fermentation, when the wort (the chilled result of the mashing process) gets to play with the yeast.  The sugars broken down from the starch of the grains or extract are eaten by the yeast to produce the all mighty alcohol and CO2 content.  There are three famous strains of yeast used in brewing: Saccharomyces cevisiae, this ale yeast is the variety that causes foaming on the top of the wort during fermentation while Saccharomyces uvarum is a lager yeast that is known as a bottom fermenter.  Brettanomyces is hands down my favorite yeast because it is responsible for the funky goodness that is lambic.  A brewer can choose between a dry yeast or a liquid yeast which has already been rehydrated as the yeast “starter” and offers the brewer more stability and fewer possibilities of infection in the brew.

Conditioning is another important step.  For homebrewers it means the addition of priming solution (cornstarch and water) or spiese (practice of using unfermented wort) into bottles before the beer is bottled.  This process is important to the development of carbonation in your bottles so your beer won’t be flat.  Most big breweries force carbonate their brews with specialized bottling equipment.  Conditioning can smooth out the flavors of the beer as well as provide carbonation.  It is vital that you keep an eye on the gravity (what determines or estimates the original and final alcohol content of the brew) during the whole process and before bottling.

Now go study …. which translates to, go drink a beer and think about it.

Alesmith

7 Dec

I had the great luck to find a good sampling of Alesmith’s 750s: Grand Cru, Speedway Stout, Old Numbskull, Horny Devil and Wee Heavy Scotch Ale. Recently split the Wee Heavy with my roommate, whose monkey toes are pictured below trying desperately to grasp the bottle.

It so happened, that she and I had been reminiscing about the glories of really delicious date cake.  I can only dream about the beautiful possibilities of this scotch ale paired with a date cake or date tart.  A gorgeous dark ruby pour even though at first glance it appears to be dark brown/black. The 10% abv is well hidden for the most part until the aftertaste and subsequent warming affect.  Two finger airy tan head that faded fast.  The aroma is really heavenly, boozy warmed dates and the flavor is a hint of the aroma but boozier.  Not overpoweringly sweet.

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